Tag Archives: puppies

Bringing home a new puppy

Well today is the first annual Tayla Day. We are currently driving to the airport to pick up Tayla. In about half an hour a drugged up little husky will be flying into Adelaide Airport.

We’ve been doing a lot to get prepared for bringing Tayla home and we think we have it all worked out. Here’s a few of the things we’ve considered:

The Resident Dog (Logan)

In all of the excitement of the new puppy it is easy to forget the needs of the resident dog. But considerations to the resident dog can make the whole process much easier.

For your resident dog to accept the new dog it is important that the resident sees how the new dog will benefit him. The new dog needs to be seen as a new playmate and a good addition to the dogs life.

The resident dog needs to get as much attention as he got before the new dog, he needs to have as many toys and get played with just as much as before the new dog came along. When the new dog comes into the home the resident dog needs to be able to retreat to their own bed for some space.

If the new dog is seen as taking attention or belongings away from the resident dog then some resentment may develop and territorial behaviors may emerge.

Introducing the dogs

The way that you introduce a new dog to the resident dog is very important for the wellbeing of both dogs. A well planned introduction can help to make the new dog comfortable, reduce any territorial behavior from the resident and reduce the likelihood of any unfortunate incidents.

Introduce the dogs at a neutral location. Walking the new dog into your living room will force the resident dogs territorial instincts to kick in, especially with two male dogs. It is best to introduce the dogs in a park or on an oval where neither dog has been before. This way neither dog can be seen as the ‘intruder’.

Anyone else expecting new dogs soon? How bout have experience introducing new dogs to resident dogs?

Watch this space, lots of photos coming soon 🙂

Things to do for Puppy Prep

With the impending new arrival only a few weeks away, I thought it only fitting to write a list of things to do before your new puppy arrives at your doorstep. This list assumes you’ve already done the research on the breed, the breeder and picked out a puppy.

The first weeks are crucial for a puppies development and relationship with you and it’s environment. There are some things you will want to do right away, and some training that you need to get right in this important time.

Take time off

Make sure that you will have time to dedicate exclusively to the puppy. Depending on the type of dog this could be anywhere from three to four days up to a few weeks. With Huskies it is generally recommended to have a few weeks to get your dog settled and comfortable. In this time you can start the toilet training and start setting boundaries. Young pups also need to have three meals a day, so you will need to be home to do this.

When Tayla arrives I am taking 2 weeks holidays, and Andrew is taking 3 weeks.

Pick a name

Decide on a name for the new puppy so that you can start using immediately. Try to decide on this a few weeks before the puppy arrives. This will give you plenty of time to mull it over, and think of a new one if you change your mind.

Buy food

Huskies are notoriously fussy eaters. Try to find out from the breeder what they have been feeding the puppy, and do your best to prepare the same. Once you have the puppy you can start to transition it to different food, but it is important not to drastically change it’s food without any transition.

Put some thought into what the treats you will get, what they are made of and what they are going to be used for (training, walking, day to day treats, etc).

For puppies, nutrition is very important. Find out what ingredients are in the treats and, if possible, keep it all natural and highly nutritional. There are specialist stores around, like The Woofery in Adelaide, that make all natural dog treats that would be great for growing puppies and their delicate stomachs. Just be sure to give the puppy a small tester to make sure that; A: they will like the treat and B: the treat won’t mess with their stomach.

Puppy proof the house and yard

You can be guaranteed that your puppy will get into every nook and cranny of the house and yard. This means that anything you don’t want your dog to get needs to be put into a cupboard, or up on a shelf far out of their reach.

Logan has stolen dishcloths from the sink, socks from the bedroom, towels, vacuum attachments, remote controls, and the list goes on. We hear Logan run outside, look out the back door and he is standing in the middle of the yard, staring back at us, with a fishbowl in his mouth.

The backyard can also be a dangerous place for dogs. Ensure that any plants you have are not poisonous if eaten, make sure there are no weeds with prickles or thorns and clear the yard of any spiders and other dangerous insects.

Decide the house rules

Decide where the puppy will be sleeping, what he will be eating, where the puppy is allowed to go in the house, what commands you are going to use for sit, no, drop, etc.

Puppies need consistency in these matters. Make sure that you make these decisions and make sure everyone in the household knows the rules. Children are far more likely to slip food off of the table for dogs, let them on the couch, etc. Make sure you explain the importance of these rules to everyone in the house.

Pick a vet

Find a vet in your neighborhood. Go and talk to them before your puppy arrives. This vet will be an important part of raising your dog, so make sure you talk to them and make sure they know their stuff.

It’s best to also find a vet that also runs Puppy Preschool classes, as this is a great way to get your puppy to enjoy going to the vet. Logan went to Puppy Preschool at our local vet, and now he loves going there. Find out when the classes are being held and, if possible, reserve a spot.

Toys

First up, don’t be disappointed if you buy the puppy a toy and they sniff it and walk away. Puppies, and more specifically Husky puppies, can be very picky. For no apparent reason they may fall in love with one toy, and completely ignore another.

Try to find some stronger toys that won’t fall apart as soon as your puppy gets their teeth into them. Unless you are sure that the toy will last, I wouldn’t bother spending a lot of money on them. Check out our post on the lifespan of toys to see what Huskies usually do to toys.

Keep in mind that while the toys need to be strong enough to withstand the puppy, they still need to be soft enough that they won’t damage the puppy’s teeth. Some toy brands, like Kong, have specialised puppy ranges with toys specifically designed for puppies.

For more detail about preparing for the new puppy, check out the page in our Husky Guide.

Anyone else expecting new puppies soon?

May I Introduce

As some of you already know, we’ve been planning on getting another Sibe for a while now. We thought that Logan is at about the right age and developmentally would benefit greatly from having a little sister running around.

Well after a lot of research and looking around we found a few puppies for sale in Tasmania.

And with that, let me introduce Tayla.

We will be picking Tayla up from the airport in a few weeks. Tayla will be about 8 weeks old when we get her. She was born in a litter with 4 other girls. One of whom may be coming to live just around the corner from us.

Her parents originated from Canada. Dogs in her family have starred in many movies; including Snow Dogs,Snow Buddies, Iron Will, 8 Below, The Last Trapper & many other documentaries.

We have a lot more of a plan with Tayla than we did with Logan. All of the dos and donts that we learnt with Logan over the last year will come in handy over the next year.

We shall be writing posts about the new puppy dramas, starting with a post about the best ways to introduce the new puppy to the household.

So watch this space 🙂

DogCity Daycare

Not long ago Channel Ten here in Adelaide did the weather at DogCity Daycare. They were nice enough to post it on YouTube. You can see Logan running around a bit towards the start. We were hanging out at the daycare while they were filming it. Was pretty funny watching Jane trying to wrangle the puppies to be nice while filming.

Postcards has also filmed a section on the daycare, but it hasn’t been on TV yet so I can’t get my hands on it. I shall definitely post it when I can.

3 tips for feeding

Feeding is really something that you need to get right from the start.

I’ve seen far too many dogs that get aggressive at feeding times. When I was young our family dog would growl and snap at anyone that came within a metre of her food at tea time. This is an easy thing to avoid if behaviour is set right while they are puppies.

These tips are most effective if they are enacted from a young age. Use caution if you are going to start trying to reduce aggressive feeding behaviour for grown dogs.

And this isn’t just for huskies either, these tips are useful for most breeds of dogs.

Before giving the dog food

Before you give your dog the bowl, or at least before you allow the dog to start eating, make him sit and look at you. Sitting will start to enforce the command from a young age, and make the dog learn some patience instead of going crazy for the food.

Looking at you creates a better connection between you and the dog. This puts you into the relationship between the dog and the food. This helps to keep the dog from getting territorial around food time and helps to increase the relationship between you and the dog.

Sitting with the dog

Every time you feed the dog, sit with them while they are eating. Pat them, talk to them, play with their paws, pretty much just annoy them.

This will keep the dog from getting to focussed on their food, which will keep them from getting surprised or startled when people are nearby and helps to decrease any territorial behaviour later in life.

Play with the food

Sounds a bit gross, especially depending on what the dog eats for dinner, but this is a great tip to avoid snapping later in life. When you are sitting with the dog, put your hand over parts of their dinner, pick a bit up and hand feed it to them, take the bowl away from them briefly and give it back to them.

This will keep the dog from getting territorial with their food. Let them know that they don’t need to guard the food, that if you take the food it doesn’t mean they’ve lost it and that the you are the boss.

Anyone else have any good tips? Let me know.